Cinnamon Leaf Essential Oil - 10 mL

Frankie & Myrrh

Cinnamon Leaf Essential Oil 10 mL/.33 fl. oz. - Organic Food Grade Oil

Botanical Name : Cinnamomum Zeylanicum

Country of Origin : Madagascar


This oil is derived from the leaf, meaning it is less likely to cause skin reactions. Always properly dilute cinnamon before contact with skin. Spicy and invigorating, Cinnamon is the perfect oil to diffuse or blend with other oils for an awakening, deodorizing effect. Perfect for the holidays or any time of the year. Use it in a diffuser and breathe in the aroma or simply open the bottle and waft it under your nose.

***Please consult your doctor before using, if you are pregnant or have any medical condition. Avoid getting product in eyes. This product has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent disease. Individual results may vary.


CINNAMON LEAF/BARK OVERVIEW INFORMATION
Cinnamon comes from a tree whose bark & leaf are used to make herbal medicine, flavorings, and scent.

Cinnamon bark is used for gastrointestinal (GI) upset, diarrhea, and gas. It is also used for stimulating appetite; for infections caused by bacteria and parasitic worms; and for menstrual cramps, the common cold, and the flu (influenza).

Cinnamon bark, as part of a multi-ingredient preparation, is applied to the penis for premature ejaculation.

In foods, cinnamon is used as a spice and as a flavoring agent in beverages.

In manufacturing, cinnamon oil is used in small amounts in toothpaste, mouthwashes, gargles, lotions, liniments, soaps, detergents, and other pharmaceutical products and cosmetics.

There are lots of different types of cinnamon. Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon) and Cinnamomum aromaticum (Cassia cinnamon or Chinese cinnamon) are commonly used. In many cases, the cinnamon spice purchased in food stores contains a combination of these different types of cinnamon. See information below for Cassia Cinnamon.

How does it work?

The oils found in cinnamon bark are thought to reduce spasms, reduce gas (flatulence), and stimulate the appetite. Cinnamon might also increase blood flow. Cinnamon bark also contains a chemical that might work like insulin to lower blood sugar.

There are also ingredients in cinnamon bark called tannins that might help wounds by acting as an astringent, and also prevent diarrhea.


Cassia cinnamon is a type of cinnamon prepared from the dried inner bark of an evergreen tree that grows in areas of southeastern Asia. In addition to cassia cinnamon, Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon) is commonly used. The cinnamon spice found in food stores might contain both of these types of cinnamon. But, the most common cinnamon sold in North America is cassia cinnamon.

People take Cassia cinnamon by mouth for diabetes, gas (flatulence), muscle and stomach spasms, preventing nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, infections, the common cold, and loss of appetite.

Some people use it for erectile dysfunction (ED), hernia, bed-wetting, joint pain, menopausal symptoms, menstrual problems, and to cause abortions. Cassia cinnamon is also used for chest pain, kidney disorders, high blood pressure, cramps, and cancer.

People apply cassia cinnamon to the skin to repel mosquitos.

In food and beverages, cassia cinnamon is used as a flavoring agent.

How does it work?
Cassia cinnamon contains hydroxychalcone and similar chemicals. These chemicals seem to improve insulin sensitivity. Cassia cinnamon also contains chemicals that may activate blood proteins that increase blood sugar uptake. These effects may improve blood sugar control in patients with diabetes. Cassia cinnamon also contains cinnamaldehyde. This chemical might have activity against bacteria and fungi. It also seems to stop the growth of some types of solid tumor cells.

USES:

Premature ejaculation. Some evidence suggests that a specific cream containing cinnamon and many other ingredients might prevent premature ejaculation.
:
Hay fever (allergic rhinitis). Research suggests that taking a specific product (ClearGuard Access Business Group, LLC) that contains cinnamon bark extract, acerola fruit concentrate, and powdered Spanish needles can reduce hay fever symptoms and people with seasonal allergies.

Yeast infection (candidiasis). Early research suggests that taking lozenges containing cinnamon bark for one week might improve yeast infections in the mouth, a condition also known as thrush, in some people with HIV.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early research suggests that consuming a formula containing cinnamon bark, bilberry, slippery elm bark, and agrimony twice daily for 3weeks can increase bowel movements and reduce stomach pain, bloating and straining in people with IBS.

Food poisoning (Salmonella infection). Consuming cinnamon bark might help treat a salmonella infection.
Diabetes.
Diarrhea.
Infections.
Worm infestations.
Common cold.
Influenza.
Upset stomach.
Gas (flatulence).
Spasms.
Appetite stimulation.
Menstrual discomfort.


Other Names and Varieties of Cinnamon

Batavia Cassia, Batavia Cinnamon, Cannelier de Ceylan, Cannelle de Ceylan, Cannelle de Saïgon, Cannelle du Sri Lanka, Ceylon Cinnamon, Ceylonzimt, Ceylonzimtbaum, Cinnamomum verum, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Corteza de Canela, Dalchini, Écorce de Cannelle, Laurus cinnamomum, Madagascar Cinnamon, Padang-Cassia, Panang Cinnamon, Saigon Cassia, Saigon Cinnamon, Sri Lanka Cinnamon, Thwak, Tvak.

Bastard Cinnamon, Canela de Cassia, Canela de la China, Canela Molida, Canelero Chino, Canelle, Cannelle Bâtarde, Cannelle Cassia, Cannelle de Ceylan, Cannelle de Chine, Cannelle de Cochinchine, Cannelle de Padang, Cannelle de Saigon, Cannelier Casse, Cannelier de Chine, Canton Cassia, Casse, Casse Odorante, Cassia, Cassia Aromaticum, Cassia Bark, Cassia Lignea, Chinazimt, Chinese Cassia, Chinese Cinnamon, Chinesischer Zimtbaum, Cinnamomi Cassiae Cortex, Cinnamomum, Cinnamomum aromaticum, Cinnamomum cassia, Cinnamomum ramulus, Cinnamon, Cinnamon Essential Oil, Cinnamon Flos, Cinnamoni Cortex, Cinnamonomi Cortex, Cortex Cinnamomi, Écorce de Cassia, False Cinnamon, Fausse Cannelle, Gui Zhi, Huile Essentielle de Cannelle, Kassiakanel, Keishi, Laurier des Indes, Nees, Ramulus Cinnamomi, Rou Gui, Saigon Cinnamon, Sthula Tvak, Taja, Zimbluten, Zimtcassie.



Cassia Type USES:

Diabetes. Some research shows that taking cassia cinnamon daily for up to 3 months helps control blood sugar and reduces cholesterol and blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes. However, other research shows that it has no effect on these measurements in people with type 2 diabetes. Reasons for the conflicting results are not entirely clear, but may relate to the dose, duration of treatment, severity of diabetes before treatment, or concurrent use of antidiabetes medications during treatment. Cassia cinnamon does not appear to improve blood sugar control and related symptoms in people with type 1 diabetes.

Mosquito repellent. Early research suggests that applying cassia cinnamon oil cream to the skin can protect against mosquito bites. But, it seems to decrease in effectiveness faster than creams containing citronella and geranium oils or DEET.

Loss of appetite.
Muscle and stomach spasms.
Intestinal gas.
Nausea and vomiting.
Diarrhea.
Common cold.
Erectile dysfunction (ED).
Bed wetting.
Joint pain.
Menopausal symptoms.
Menstrual problems.
Chest pain.
High blood pressure.
Kidney problems.


Consuming cinnamon bark in food amounts is LIKELY SAFE. Cinnamon bark is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in amounts used for medicine. These amounts are slightly higher than amounts found in food. However, cinnamon bark is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in large amounts. Also, taking cinnamon oil by mouth is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. The oil can be irritating to the skin and mucous membranes, including the stomach, intestine, and urinary tract. It can cause side effects such as diarrhea, vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, and others.

Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Consuming cinnamon bark is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Do not take larger amounts of cinnamon bark if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Not enough is known about the safety of taking larger amounts.

Diabetes: Cinnamon bark might lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use cinnamon bark.

Surgery: Cinnamon bark can affect blood sugar levels and might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking cinnamon at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.




Cassia cinnamon is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in foods and when taken by mouth in medicinal doses for up to 4 months.

Cassia cinnamon is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin in the short-term.

Cassia cinnamon is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in large amounts for a long period of time. Taking large amounts of cassia cinnamon might cause side effects in some people. Cassia cinnamon can contain large amounts of a chemical called coumarin. In people who are sensitive, coumarin might cause or worsen liver disease. When applied to the skin, cassia cinnamon can sometimes cause skin irritation and allergic skin reactions.
****Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking Cassia cinnamon if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Cassia cinnamon is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately. One gram of cassia cinnamon daily has been used safely in 13-18 year-old adolescents for up to 3 months.

Diabetes: Cassia cinnamon can lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully, if you have diabetes and use cassia cinnamon in amounts larger than the amounts normally found in food.

Liver disease: Cassia cinnamon contains a chemical that might harm the liver. If you have liver disease, do not take cassia cinnamon in amounts larger than the amounts normally found in food.

Surgery: Cassia cinnamon might lower blood sugar and might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking cassia cinnamon as a medicine at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.



CINNAMON BARK INTERACTIONS

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination
Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with CINNAMON bark
Cinnamon bark might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking cinnamon bark along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.


CASSIA CINNAMON INTERACTIONS

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination
Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with CASSIA CINNAMON
Cassia cinnamon might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking cassia cinnamon along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs) interacts with CASSIA CINNAMON
Taking very large doses of cassia cinnamon might harm the liver, especially in people with existing liver disease. Taking large amounts of cassia cinnamon along with medications that might also harm the liver might increase the risk of liver damage. Do not take large amounts of cassia cinnamon if you are taking a medication that can harm the liver.

Some medications that can harm the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol and others), amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), isoniazid (INH), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), methyldopa (Aldomet), fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), erythromycin (Erythrocin, Ilosone, others), phenytoin (Dilantin), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), and many others.


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