Tea Tree Essential Oil - 10mL

Frankie & Myrrh

Tea Tree Essential Oil

Organic -- 10mL/.33oz -- with dropper cap

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by Frankie & Myrrh -- 50 Post St, San Francisco, California frankieandmyrrh.com

Premium Australian Tea Tree Oil. . Use it in a diffuser and breathe in aroma or simply open the bottle and waft it under your nose. Place a few drops in a steamy bath for a relaxing experience. Use a drop or two in a blend with your moisturizer to help nurture your skin.

Botanical Name : Melaleuca Alternifolia

Country of Origin : Australia

Tea Tree has an amazing woody and slightly medicinal smell. Tea Tree (aka melaleuca oil) is one of the most antiseptic and antifungal plants in the world. Because it is very soothing to the skin, Tea Tree is widely used in the treatment of dermatological conditions. Tea Tree was so valued by the Australians during World War II that makers of Tea Tree oil were exempt from draft until enough essential oil had been stockpiled. It was given to every soldier to help with tropical infections, foot issues, and even treatment of wounds.

FYI From the Wikipedia:


TEA TREE OIL
Other Names:
Aceite del Árbol de Té, Australian Tea Tree Oil, Huile de Melaleuca, Huile de Théier, Huile de Théier Australien, Huile Essentielle de Théier, Melaleuca alternifolia, Melaleuca Oil, Oil of Melaleuca, Oleum Melaleucae, Tea Tree, Tea Tree Essential Oil.


Tea tree oil (TTO), or melaleuca oil, is an essential oil with a fresh camphoraceous odor and a color that ranges from pale yellow to nearly colorless and clear.[2] It is taken from the leaves of the Melaleuca alternifolia, which is native to Southeast Queensland and the Northeast coast of New South Wales, Australia. Tea Tree oil should not be confused with tea oil, the sweet seasoning and cooking oil from pressed seeds of the tea plant Camellia sinensis (beverage tea) or the tea oil plant Camellia oleifera.

Tea tree oil is widely used in low concentrations in cosmetics and skin washes. Tea tree oil has been claimed to be useful for treating a wide variety of medical conditions. It shows some promise as an antimicrobial. Tea Tree oil may be effective in a variety of dermatological conditions including dandruff, acne, lice, herpes, and other skin infections.

The name tea tree is used for several plants, mostly from Australia and New Zealand, from the family Myrtaceae, related to the myrtle. The use of the name probably originated from Captain Cook's description of one of these shrubs that he used to make an infusion to drink in place of tea.

The commercial tea tree oil industry originated in the 1920s when Arthur Penfold, an Australian, investigated the business potential of a number of native extracted oils; he reported that tea tree oil had promise as it exhibited powerful antiseptic properties.[6]

Tea tree oil is extracted from Melaleuca alternifolia commercially.

Tea tree oil is defined by the International Standard ISO 4730 ("Oil of Melaleuca, Terpinen-4-ol type"), which specifies levels of 15 components which are needed to define the oil as "tea tree oil." The oil has been described as having a fresh, camphor-like smell.

Tea tree oil contains over 98 compounds, and has six chemotypes, which are oils with different chemical compositions. These include a terpinen-4-ol chemotype, a terpinolene chemotype, and four 1,8-cineole chemotypes. Terpinen-4-ol is the major TTO component responsible for antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.[8] A second component 1,8-cineole, is likely responsible for most allergies in TTO products. Adverse reactions to TTO diminish with minimization of 1,8-cineole content. In commercial production, TTO is prepared as a terpinen-4-ol chemotype.

In vitro studies show that tea tree oil is capable of killing Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a laboratory setting.Studies have shown that it demonstrated similar rates of eradication when compared to treatment with mupirocin. A 2005 review stated that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine use for this purpose in a clinical setting. A 2012 review by the NIH rates Tea tree oil as "possibly effective" for three applications, saying that "a 5% tea tree oil gel appears to be as effective as 5% benzoyl peroxide" for treating mild to moderate acne, that "topical application of 100% tea tree oil solution, twice daily for six months, can cure fungal toenail infection in about 18% of people who try it," and that "a 10% tea tree oil cream works about as well as tolnaftate 1% cream" in treating symptoms of athlete's foot, although being less effective than clotrimazole or terbinafine.[12]

A 2006 review of the toxicity of tea tree oil concludes that it may be used externally in its diluted form by the majority of individuals without adverse effect (provided oxidization is avoided).[13] Tea Tree oil is poisonous when taken internally. Tea tree oil may be effective in a variety of dermatologic conditions including dandruff, acne, lice, herpes, and other skin infections.

Tea tree oil is a commercially refined composition of several naturally occurring chemical compounds and is hazardous if misused. Available literature suggests that TTO can be used topically in diluted form by the majority of individuals without adverse effects.


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